Pontiac's War 1763-1766

[ 1763 - 1766 ]

Pontiac's War, Pontiac's Conspiracy, or Pontiac's Rebellion was a war that was launched in 1763 by a loose confederation of elements of Native American tribes primarily from the Great Lakes region, the Illinois Country, and Ohio Country who were dissatisfied with British postwar policies in the Great Lakes region after the British victory in the French and Indian War (1754–1763). Warriors from numerous tribes joined the uprising in an effort to drive British soldiers and settlers out of the region. The war is named after the Ottawa leader Pontiac, the most prominent of many native leaders in the conflict.

The war began in May 1763 when Native Americans, offended by the policies of British General Jeffrey Amherst, attacked a number of British forts and settlements. Eight forts were destroyed, and hundreds of colonists were killed or captured, with many more fleeing the region. Hostilities came to an end after British Army expeditions in 1764 led to peace negotiations over the next two years. Native Americans were unable to drive away the British, but the uprising prompted the British government to modify the policies that had provoked the conflict.

Warfare on the North American frontier was brutal, and the killing of prisoners, the targeting of civilians, and other atrocities were widespread. In what some historians consider an incident of biological warfare, British officers at Fort Pitt gave smallpox-infested blankets to the besieging Native Americans with the intent of spreading the disease, possibly contributing to the smallpox epidemic that killed much of their population.

The ruthlessness and treachery of the conflict was a reflection of a growing divide between the separate populations of the British colonists and Native Americans. Contrary to popular belief, the British government did not issue the Royal Proclamation of 1763 in reaction to Pontiac's War, though the conflict did provide an impetus for the application of the Proclamation's Indian clauses. This proved unpopular with British colonists, and may have been one of the early contributing factors to the American Revolution.

Belligerents Initiation Date Termination Date
Kingdom of Great Britain and Ojibwe 1763 1766 View
Kingdom of Great Britain and Potawatomi 1763 1766 View
Kingdom of Great Britain and Wyandot people 1763 1766 View
Kingdom of Great Britain and Miami people 1763 1766 View
Kingdom of Great Britain and Wea 1763 1766 View
Kingdom of Great Britain and Kickapoo people 1763 1766 View
Kingdom of Great Britain and Mascouten 1763 1766 View
Kingdom of Great Britain and Piankeshaw 1763 1766 View
Kingdom of Great Britain and Lenape 1763 1766 View
Kingdom of Great Britain and Shawnees 1763 1766 View
Kingdom of Great Britain and Mingo 1763 1766 View
Kingdom of Great Britain and Seneca people 1763 1766 View

Related Conflicts

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