November Revolt in Polish Lands of Russia 1830-1831

[ 1830 - 1831 ]

After the Congress of Vienna, St. Petersburg had organized its Polish lands as the Congress Kingdom of Poland, granting it a quite liberal constitution, its own army, and limited autonomy within the tsarist empire. In the 1820s, however, Russian rule grew more arbitrary, and secret societies were formed by intellectuals in several cities to plot an overthrow. In November 1830, Polish troops in Warsaw rose in revolt. When the government of Congress Poland proclaimed solidarity with the insurrectionists shortly thereafter, a new Polish-Russian war began. The rebels' requests for aid from France were ignored, and their reluctance to abolish serfdom cost them the support of the peasantry. By September 1831, the Russians had subdued Polish resistance and forced 6,000 resistance fighters into exile in France, beginning a time of harsh repression of intellectual and religious activity throughout Poland. At the same time, Congress Poland lost its constitution and its army.

After the failure of the November Revolt, clandestine conspiratorial activity continued on Polish territory. An exiled Polish political and intellectual elite established a base of operations in Paris. A conservative group headed by Adam Czartoryski (leader of the November Revolt) relied on foreign diplomatic support to restore Poland's status as established by the Congress of Vienna, which Russia had routinely violated beginning in 1819. Otherwise, this group was satisfied with a return to monarchy and traditional social structures. 

Total Casualties 123000 Killed and Wounded
Casualties Killed / Wounded
Military Casualties Killed 63000 /Wounded 60000
Civilian Casualties Killed / Wounded
Note
Belligerents Initiation Date Termination Date
Congress Poland and Russian Empire 1830 / 11 / 29 1831 / 10 / 21 View
Army of Congress Poland and Imperial Russian Army 1830 / 11 / 29 1831 / 10 / 21 View

Related Conflicts

No Releted Conflicts