The Chicago Race Riot in America 1919

[ 1919 ]

Chicago racial tension, concentrated on the South Side, was particularly exacerbated by the pressure for adequate housing: the black population had increased from 44,000 in 1910 to more than 109,000 in 1920. The riot was triggered by the death of a black youth on July 27. He had been swimming in Lake Michigan and had drifted into an area tacitly reserved for whites; he was stoned and he shortly drowned. When police refused to arrest the white man whom black observers held responsible for the incident, indignant crowds began to gather on the beach, and the disturbance began. Distorted rumours swept the city as sporadic fighting broke out between gangs and mobs of both races. Violence escalated with each incident, and for 13 days Chicago was without law and order despite the fact that the state militia had been called out on the fourth day. By the end, 38 were dead (23 blacks, 15 whites), 537 injured, and 1,000 black families made homeless.

The horror of the Chicago Race Riot helped shock the nation out of indifference to its growing racial conflict. Pres. Woodrow Wilson castigated the "white race" as "the aggressor" in both the Chicago and Washington riots, and efforts were launched to promote racial harmony through voluntary organizations and ameliorative legislation in Congress. The period also marked a new willingness on the part of black men to fight for their rights in the face of injustice and oppression.

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