Tlaxcala (Nahua state)

Tlaxcala (Nahuatl Tlaxcallān "place of maize tortillas") was a pre-Columbian city and state in central Mexico.

Ancient Tlaxcala was a republic ruled by a council of between 50 and 200 chief political officials (teuctli [sg.], teteuctin [pl.]) (Fargher et al. 2010). These officials gained their positions through service to the state, usually in warfare, and as a result came from both the noble (pilli) and commoner (macehualli) classes. Following the Spanish Conquest, Tlaxcala was divided into four fiefdoms (señoríos) by the Spanish corregidor Gómez de Santillán in 1545 (26 years after the Conquest). These fiefdoms were Ocotelolco, Quiahuiztlan, Tepeticpac, and Tizatlan. At this time, four great houses or lineages emerged and claimed hereditary rights to each fiefdom and created fictitious genealogies extending back into the pre-Columbian era to justify their claims (Gibson 1952).

Details
Formation Date 1500
Conflict Name Initiation Year Termination Year Total Killed Total Casuality
Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire 1519-1521 1519 1521 unknown unknown
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