Douglas T2D

The Douglas T2D was an American twin engine bomber aircraft contracted by the military, and required to be usable on wheels or floats, and operating from aircraft-carriers. It was the first twin engined aircraft to be operated from an aircraft carrier. 


Douglas T2D
Class Aircraft
Type Bomber
Manufacturer Douglas Aircraft Company
Origin United States of America
Country Name Origin Year
United States of America 1927
ManufacturerName Production From Production To Quantity
Douglas Aircraft Company 31 View

The first three T2D-1 aircraft were delivered to the torpedo bomber squadron VT-2 on 25 May 1927, being used for successful trials aboard the aircraft carrier USS Langley. A further 9 T2D-1 were ordered in 1927, these normally being operated as floatplanes, partly due to criticism from the Army of the Navy operating large land based bombers, and partly because its large size prevented the Langley from embarking a full airwing. 

A further 18 aircraft were ordered in June 1930 as patrol floatplanes, being designated P2D-1. These were operated by Patrol Squadron VP-3 in the Panama Canal Zone until they were replaced by PBYs in 1937. 

Role Torpedo bomber
Manufacturer Douglas Aircraft Company
First flight 27 January 1927
Introduction 1927
Retired 1937
Primary user United States Navy
Number built 31


General characteristics

  • Crew: Four
  • Length: 42 ft 0 in (12.80 m)
  • Wingspan: 57 ft 0 in (17.37 m)
  • Height: 15 ft 11 in (4.85 m)
  • Wing area: 886 sq ft (82.31 sq m)
  • Empty weight: 6,011 lb (2726 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 10,523 lb (4773 kg)
  • Powerplant: 2 x Wright R-1750 Cyclone 9 cylinder single row radial, 525 hp (391 kW) each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 109 knots (201 km/h, 125 mph)
  • Range: 397 nm (735 km, 457 miles)
  • Service ceiling 13,830 ft (4215 m)
  • Wing loading: 12.2 lb/ft (58.0 kg/m)
  • Power/mass: 0.10 hp/lb (0.16 kW/kg)
  • Climb to 5,000 ft (1,520 m): 5 minutes

Armament

  • 2 x 7.62 mm (0.3 in) machine guns
  • 1 x 1,618 lb (734 kg) torpedo or bomb(s)

End notes