Steyr ACR

The Steyr ACR was a prototype flechette-firing assault rifle built for the US Army Advanced Combat Rifle program of 1989/90. Although the Steyr design proved effective, as did most of the weapons submitted, the entire ACR program ended with none of the entrants achieving performance 100% better than the M16A2, the baseline for a successful ACR weapon.The Steyr ACR has some superficial resemblance to the Steyr AUG, although it is rounder and the barrel is covered for almost its entire length, as opposed to the AUG where much of the barrel was exposed. Like the AUG the ACR is a bullpup design with the 24 round magazine located quite close to the buttstock of the gun. The stock was split from the magazine forward to a location just below the sights to open for cleaning. An optical sight was included as a standard feature.

Steyr ACR
Class Manportable
Type Rifles
Manufacturer Ulrich Zedrosser
Origin Austria
Country Name Origin Year
Austria 1987
Country Name Operational Year Retirement Year
Austria View
ManufacturerName Production From Production To Quantity
Ulrich Zedrosser View

The Steyr ACR has some superficial resemblance to the Steyr AUG, although it is rounder and the barrel is covered for almost its entire length, as opposed to the AUG where much of the barrel was exposed. Like the AUG the ACR is a bullpup design with the 24-round magazine located quite close to the buttstock of the gun. The stock was "split" from the magazine forward to a location just below the sights to open for cleaning. An optical sight was included as a standard feature.

The Steyr employed a unique system to cycle through ammunition: instead of driving rounds forward into the chamber and being held in place by a locking bolt, the entire chamber traveled vertically the width of the round. After firing the gases "blew" the chamber vertically downward, where a new round was forced into the chamber from the rear, forcing the old round out an ejection port ahead of the magazine. Springs then raised the chamber back into position where it was locked into a fixed block. The firing pin was fixed above the chamber, entering through a small hole and striking the ring of primer to fire. The chamber was normally held in the "down" position, the trigger releasing it to allow the springs to drive it upward and fire.

Weight - 7.12lb (3.2kg)unloaded

Length - 30.7in (780mm)

Barrel length - 21.3in (541mm)

Cartridge - 5.56x45mm SCF (synthetic case flechette)

Rate of fire - Semi automatic, burst, fully automatic

Muzzle velocity - 4,757ft/s (1,450m/s)

Feed system - 24-round box magazine

End notes